Which two phrases in this information about medicare prescription drug coverage are noun phrases?

Answers

The correct answers are C. Not all Medicare drug plans and D. for the “Medicare Approved” seal on drug discount cards to make sure you are getting the best deal. A noun phrase or nominal phrase (abbreviated NP) is a phrase which has a noun (or indefinite pronoun) as its headword, or which performs the same grammatical function as such a phrase. These two sentences are a clear example of noun phrases.

Explanation:  If this helped please mark this as brainliest :)

The correct answers are C. Not all Medicare drug plans and D. for the “Medicare Approved” seal on drug discount cards to make sure you are getting the best deal. A noun phrase or nominal phrase (abbreviated NP) is a phrase which has a noun (or indefinite pronoun) as its headword, or which performs the same grammatical function as such a phrase. These two sentences are a clear example of noun phrases.

Part C

Explanation:

B). The subset of the US population with Medicare

C). Not all Medicare drug plans.

Explanation:

Noun phrases are elucidated as the group or cluster of words that together functions as a noun in the sentence. These words functions together as a unit and act as either the subject of verb or the object of the preposition or verb. It could easily be identified by checking the possibility of its substitution with a pronoun. In the given excerpt, the phrases 'the subset of the US population with Medicare' and 'not all Medicare drug plans' are the noun phrases as they function as nouns/subjects in the sentence and could easily be substituted with a pronoun. Thus, options B and C are the correct answers.

Answer:

“Not all Medicare drug plans are the same” and “for the “Medicare Approved” seal on drug discount cards to make sure you are getting the best deal.”

These two phrases in this information about Medicare prescription drug coverage are noun phrases

Explanation:

Noun phrases describes the noun in a sentence. A noun phrase will have a noun and modifiers which describe them. Modifiers can come before or after the noun. Noun phrase can act as the subject, object or act as prepositional object of the phrase.

In first line, if you ask the question ‘What Medicare drug plans are’, answer will be ‘not all are same’. The noun phrase has noun ‘Medicare drugs’ which is acting as object of the phrase. In the next line, it is acting as prepositional object as there is a preposition ‘on’ after the noun ‘Medicare approved seal’. So, ask a question ‘where is the seal’, answer is ‘on drug discount cards’.

answer:

c and d are the answers.

explanation:

to make it more clear "not all medicare drug plans" and "for the medicare approved seal on drug discount cards"

answer:

a noun clause is a group of words in a sentence that has the function of a noun (the subject or the object of the sentence). from the given options the ones that are examples of noun phrases are "everyone with medicare" and "not all medicare drug plans" because we can see that they act like nouns. the first option represents a verbal phrase and the last option is a prepositional phrase.

explanation:

A noun phrase is formed by a noun or pronoun, this one receives the name of the head, and any dependent words before or after the head. Dependent words are the ones that give specific details about the head. An example of a noun phrase can be: a quantifier + a determiner + an adjective + a noun. However, there are some others that are longer and with more dependent words.

Following this concept the two noun phrases in the text are:

1. Senior citizens and others who need medical assistance  

2. The subset of the US population with Medicare  

One Correct answer is Not all Medicare drug plans is one correct

Incorrect answer is for the Medicare Approved seal on drug discount cards

Explanation:

I only know one of the two correct answers but felt that at least it would be helpful to know one correct and one incorrect.



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